Thursday, April 21, 2011

The Man Who Murdered Booker Wright























This is him, the man who murdered my grandfather.  His name is Lloyd Cork and he was 22 years old when he shot Booker Wright.  He's been in prison for 38 years.

16 comments:

  1. Have you or anyone else attempted to interview Llody Cork?

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    1. Hello there,

      We were not allowed to interview him with cameras. The state of Mississippi would not grant permission. Cork and I have exchanged letters and I am hoping to sit down with him face-to-face in a few months. The film is over, but the search for the truth continues for me.

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    2. this is amazing

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  3. Hi, Yvette! Thanks for the really quick response!! I saw your and your grandfather's story (in part) on Democracy Now. It's such a compelling story that I'm fascinated by it and grateful that you've decided to get to the bottom of it.

    I will be keeping up with any updates. Good luck to you and thank you!

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  4. Thanks for being interested in this story. People remembering him keeps a piece of him alive, I think. I just created a Facebook page, Searching for Booker Wright...I'll be leaving lots of updates there as well, so you may want to "like" that page. Best to you!
    https://www.facebook.com/SearchingForBookerWright

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  5. ms. yvette, i just saw your film, & i must say its a inspireing story, your grandfather inspires me !!! i am very hurt to know how, your family lost your grand father, but on the other hand im so happy & filled with pride when i think of what he stood for, what he represented !!! & the things he did for his family & community. my grand fathers name was also booker, as is my father. i had not heard about this story untill i saw the preview on tv. i feel like a million things to say, but i will leave you with this, i wont forget ur family's story, i will keep up with every update..if i can ever be of service please let me know . god bless u & urs

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    1. I think it's so cool that you come from a line of Bookers. Thank you for connecting and for supporting this story. Lester Holt said that he can't believe that Booker Wright isn't included in the history books. My goal is to make his story go viral, I want as many people as possible to know about his bravery and what he had to overcome to achieve the American dream. So, I unapologetically accept your support! GO BOOKER WRIGHT@@@!!!!

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  6. Watching the story of Booker right now on TV. Wow, how interesting.

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  7. I would like to hear Lloyd Corks story, I'm thinking he was paid to kill Mr. Wright.

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  8. Just saw the story on Dateline about your Grandfather, and was inspired to tears. I was alive, but very young, seeing the Civil Rights marches, riots, etc. on television. I'll never forget those images. I was, thankfully, brought up in a home with no prejudice that I observed. I am presently doing a play that, while a comedy, deals with more current issues of racism and classism in the Texas of 1992, and was wondering: Does it still exist? What was it *really like*? What *is* it really like now? Watching this film helped me to understand that while it seems to be much better than it was, these prejudices and fears for the South go back a LONG WAY, and will still be awhile before they completely are gone. However, it does my heart good to see so many compassionate people responding well to your Grandfather's story, just as I did. Good luck to you in your search to find your Grandfather's essence, Yvette!

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    1. Thank you so much for connecting with this story! I would agree with your assessment. As a nation, and in the South, we've come very far in terms of race. We're just not finished with this important work. Booker Wright's essence, some days it eludes, some days I can feel him. This process has been an amazing one, but I would I give it all up for an hour with him.

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  9. Die...seriously, you piece of shit!

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  10. @^^ not only have you been unnecessarily vulgar, but unclear as to whether your venom is intended for mr cork or ms johnson. we dont even know the stance this vitriolic outburst takes. it accomplishes nothing but to deface this lovely and thoughtful blog. ill leave this seperate from my intended post, that both may be deleted when they come to ms johnson's attention.

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  11. ms johnson, i just saw bookers place. it was gripping. this coming off a viewing of a film that heavily featured interviews the son of metger evars' killer, and another detailing the sovereignty commission and their direct role in the murders of the sncc three. reading john stuart mills' on liberty earlier today certainly put me in an interesting frame of mind for learning about the common connection to what i hadnt ever realized was such a tragically pivotal place in the civil rights movement.

    your grandfather was a very brave man. thank you for sharing his story with us.please, should you find the time, give us an update on your conversations with mr cork, and any new information regarding the possible involvement of the greenwood police in orchestrating this seemingly senseless crime.

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  12. I am also very much interested to know if you ever talked to Mr. Cork. I just watched the documentary this morning on Netflix and it really struck something in me. I've grown up in the south (central Florida) my whole life and my father's family came from Pulaski, Tennessee decades ago, so I've kind of grown up around that subtle racist and prejudice attitude. Growing up I didn't exactly agree with it but it was all I knew. As I've gotten older and more mature (I'm 26) I have realized even if subtle, any prejudice is wrong and hateful even when you don't even mean to be. Thank you so much for telling his story. He makes you want to move forward together and to love everyone for who they are and not fall into the trap of stereotyping and being prejudiced against people who are different from you. He makes you realize that underneath our skin color and our socioeconomic situation, we are all people with real feelings. Thank you :)

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